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Blended Biomass allows more Bagasse as Feedstock for Furfural! 

A report on blended biomass for cogeneration, by Amaury Perez Sanchez: Cuba, like other countries with few fossil energy resources, has used biomass to fuel its industrial processes for decades. More recently, it has worked to improve efficiency and increase the role that these plants play in supplying grid power.

DalinYebo's Comment: Using sugarcane bagasse for electricity cogeneration is a well established practise. A recent reports suggestions blended biomass for co-firing of additional 'waste' biomass in a sugar mill. However, bagasse, in our humble opinion, is a more valuable biomass feedstock for fuels, chemicals, paper, feed etc., than just another fuel source. Supplying a bagasse-fired boiler with a biomass blend is a first step in releasing this value, as it would make more bagasse available for the production of furfural. The Biomass.Market™ platform helps sugar millers in managing the supply of additional, blended biomass .

The sugarcane agribusiness has supported the Cuban economy for decades, and nowadays it plays an important role in the rapid development and growth of the country’s internal and external markets. Today, sugarcane biomass constitutes the energy source with highest potential in the medium to long term, as Cuba is an agricultural country with a sugarcane industry that generates millions of tons per year of high-energy-value residues.

However, the once-strong Cuban sugar industry, which was capable of producing up to eight million tons of sugar per year, hit the bottom in 2009–2010 when total sugar production tumbled to 1.1 million metric tons (mt), the lowest level in 105 years. The situation is beginning to improve, and the administration is taking some important measures to boost efficiency and increase production. ...

 

Read the full report @ Bagasse and Blended Biomass Cogeneration Advances (Cuban Example) | Biomass Blog

 For a related article, see www.ipsnews.net.

 

  • Bagasse
  • Biobased Energy
  • Blended Biomass
  • Cogeneration
  • Green Electricity
  • Biomass.Market™...

Source:  http://www.dalinyebo.com/item/1226-bagasse-and-blended-biomass-cogeneration

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 La Belle au bois dormant (“The Beauty in the Sleeping Woods”).

We recently had the opportunity to share the story of International Furan Technology (Pty) Ltd at the Innovation and Investment Forum of WFC2015: XiV World Forestry Congress in Durban

"Story telling is one of the great African traditions and in that tradition, honourable delegates, distinguished ladies and gentlemen, your Excellency Naledi Pandor, Minister of Science and Technology, let me try to share with you our story of

  1. how we took a biorefining idea first to the labs, then
  2. got it financed and
  3. commercialised it.

In order to do that, I shall first introduce you to the chemical, its market place and then highlight in five or so minutes a journey that started in 1998."

The slide's narrative, which follows-on from Gianluca's theme of the "Sleeping Beauty", can be downloaded here (by registered users).

WFC2015, XIV World Forestry Congress

Subtheme 4: Encouraging product innovation an sustainable trade

Dialogue 1 -4: Innovation and Investment Forum

Sub session 3: From the Labs to the Marketplace

Thursday 10 Sep 2015, 08h30 – 11h20.

Chair:  Jukka Tissari (FAO)

Keynote: Charlie Clarke (Sappi): SA biorefinery development

Panel (left to right)

Elizabeth de Carvalhaes (Ibá, Brazil)

Jegatheswaran Ratnasingam (Univ Putra Malaysia)

Philipp Steiner (CEO of International Furan Technology (Pty) Ltd)

Johann Görgens (Univ. of Stellenbosch, SA)

Chris Nicholson (IDC, South Africa)

Riikka Joukio (Metsä Group): Bioproduct mill and a globally unique ecosystem for bioeconomy

Moderator: Ms Roberta Annan

Erkki Hellen (VTT, Finland): New opportunities with nanocelluloses and foam technologies

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 Image: flickr.com

  • Furfural
  • Biorefineries
  • Pulp Mills
  • BBSBiorefining™...

Source:  http://www.dalinyebo.com/item/1224-from-the-labs-to-the-markets-the-furfural-story

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 One-pot furfural conversion, using a zeolite catalyst

Our International Furan Technology (Pty) Ltd subsidiary supplies biomass processing technologies for the manufacture of furfural (and other bio-renewable chemicals). We therefore have our 'radar screen' set on new processes or down-stream product developments and as a result, the following research caught our interest.

Heterogeneous, stable catalyst promoting acid and reduction routes to bio-products.

Abstract [1]

Aiming at the valorisation of furfural via sustainable routes based on process intensification and heterogeneous catalysis, the one-pot conversion of this renewable platform chemical to useful bio-products, namely furfuryl alkyl ethers (FEs), levulinate esters (LEs), levulinic acid (LA), angelica lactones (AnLs) and γ-valerolactone (GVL), was investigated using a single heterogeneous catalyst, in 2-butanol, at 120 °C. Various chemical reactions are involved in this process, which requires catalysts with active sites for acid and reduction chemistry. For this purpose, it was explored for the first time the catalytic potentialities of modified versions of zeolite beta containing Al and Sn sites prepared from commercially available nanocrystalline zeolite beta via post-synthesis partial dealumination followed by solid-state ion-exchange. The post-synthesis conditions influenced considerably the catalytic performances of these types of materials. The best-performing catalyst was (Sn)SSIE-beta1 with Si/(Al + Sn) = 19 (Sn/Al = 27), which led to total yield of bio-products of 83% at 86% Fur conversion, and exhibited steady catalytic performance for six consecutive runs. A systematic catalytic study using the prepared catalysts with different bio-products as substrates, together with the molecular level and microstructural characterisation of the materials, helped understand the effects of different material properties on the specific reaction pathways in the overall system. These studies led to mechanistic insights into the reaction network of Fur to the bio-products in alcohol media, upon which a kinetic model was developed for the first time. The superior performance of (Sn)SSIE-beta1 in various steps was related to the dealumination degree, dispersion and amount of Sn-sites, and acid properties. Continue

Reference

[1] sciencedirect.com

  • Biorenewable Chemicals
  • Furfural
  • Levulinic Acid...

Source:  http://www.dalinyebo.com/levulinic-acid-and-other-biobased-chemicals

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 One-pot furfural conversion, using a zeolite catalyst

Our International Furan Technology (Pty) Ltd subsidiary supplies biomass processing technologies for the manufacture of furfural (and other bio-renewable chemicals). We therefore have our 'radar screen' set on new processes or down-stream product developments and as a result, the following research caught our interest.

Heterogeneous, stable catalyst promoting acid and reduction routes to bio-products.

Abstract [1]

Aiming at the valorisation of furfural via sustainable routes based on process intensification and heterogeneous catalysis, the one-pot conversion of this renewable platform chemical to useful bio-products, namely furfuryl alkyl ethers (FEs), levulinate esters (LEs), levulinic acid (LA), angelica lactones (AnLs) and γ-valerolactone (GVL), was investigated using a single heterogeneous catalyst, in 2-butanol, at 120 °C. Various chemical reactions are involved in this process, which requires catalysts with active sites for acid and reduction chemistry. For this purpose, it was explored for the first time the catalytic potentialities of modified versions of zeolite beta containing Al and Sn sites prepared from commercially available nanocrystalline zeolite beta via post-synthesis partial dealumination followed by solid-state ion-exchange. The post-synthesis conditions influenced considerably the catalytic performances of these types of materials. The best-performing catalyst was (Sn)SSIE-beta1 with Si/(Al + Sn) = 19 (Sn/Al = 27), which led to total yield of bio-products of 83% at 86% Fur conversion, and exhibited steady catalytic performance for six consecutive runs. A systematic catalytic study using the prepared catalysts with different bio-products as substrates, together with the molecular level and microstructural characterisation of the materials, helped understand the effects of different material properties on the specific reaction pathways in the overall system. These studies led to mechanistic insights into the reaction network of Fur to the bio-products in alcohol media, upon which a kinetic model was developed for the first time. The superior performance of (Sn)SSIE-beta1 in various steps was related to the dealumination degree, dispersion and amount of Sn-sites, and acid properties. Continue

Reference

[1] sciencedirect.com

  • Biorenewable Chemicals
  • Furfural
  • Levulinic Acid...

Source:  http://dalinyebo.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=1222:levulinic-acid-and-other-biobased-chemicals-via-one-pot-conversion-of-furfural&Itemid=2828

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Green is the New Cool!

Insulation mats made form recycled PET bottles are already commercially available. They are very effective e.g. as geyser blankets or as roof insulation, are easy to install and pose no health threat.

Since we covered our geysers with PET-fibre blankets, the electricity consumption dropped by 15% (P. Steiner)

Carbon Capture

Put it simply: Carbon sequestration is about capturing CO2 that is emitted as a result of burning fossil fuels (e.g. oil, coal or gas) and storing it underground (for ever), thus lowering the CO2 levels and reducing global warming. For a more detailed explanation, have a look at wikipedia, where you will also find a concept of how a biomass business, like ours, can contribute to a negative CO2 footprint.

Furfural is made from 100% Natural Carbon

100% of the carbons in the furfural molecule are made by nature, through photosynthesis of CO2 and water. Furfural is made from the hemicellulose fraction of the biomass (see "how it is made?"). The hemicellulose is of no use to the food/feed value chain. 

Hemicellulose, is also the second most-abundant organic material in nature, typically representing 25–35% of lignocellulose by mass.

Furfural and Carbon Capture, Storage & Energy Savings

Furfural is a versatile chemical building block that is made from plant carbon. Therefore, any material that is made from furfural and that lasts 'forever', is a form of carbon storage. Using such materials to reduce (domestic) electricity consumption, will further reduce CO2 emission, where gas or coal-fired power-stations are used to generate the electricity that is used for heating or cooling a house.

The pathway from furfural to PET is explained in our "a truly biobased TPA for PET" article ( May 2015).

  • Furfural
  • PET
  • Bioplastics...

Source:  http://www.dalinyebo.com/green-is-the-new-cool

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