Renewable production of phthalic anhydride from biomass-derived furan and maleic anhydrid

Center for Catalytic Science and Technology (CCST):  The renewable production of chemicals and fuels from biomass is inherently difficult due to competing side reactions. CCST has demonstrated the selective production of phthalic anhydride, a chemical used for the manufacture of plasticizers, unsaturated polyesters, and resins in the millions of tonnes per year, from biomass ..

DalinYebo‘s insight:

Furfural is the feedstock to make furan as well as maleic anhydrid. See http://www.dalinyebo.com/item/708-furfural-green-chemical-building-block.

See on sites.udel.edu

via on Scoop.it – Furfural and its many By-products...

Source:  https://dalinyebo.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/renewable-production-of-phthalic-anhydride-from-biomass-derived/

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Paid4PreTreatment™: Smart integration of furfural production

In July 2013, we reported on the potential that distiller's grain has for furfural production. The smart integration of furfural production into the mass and energy balance (The-Right-Balance™: in this case of a corn ethanol plant) results in energy savings, an additional saleable product (furfural) and an improved end product (in this case animal feed). These improvements were highlighted by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA) in a process and economic study[1]:

Furfural was produced from DDG while animal feed value of DDG was also retained.

Furfural was produced through dilute acid reaction followed by batch or BRD process.

BRD was superior to batch method in furfural yield and purity.

The economic model predicted an increased profitability for corn ethanol plants.

Animal feed yield was crucial to the economy of the furfural conversion process.

The basis of their economic evaluation is based on assuming favourable inputs (e.g. highest furfural price, best yields, experimental laboratory and mathematical modelling conditions, etc.).

The review of this publication, against our practical furfural processes experience, predicts a lower benefit than the study suggests.

However, it is important to note that there is certainly a benefit (!) and, in addition, there are other untapped downstream revenue potentials.

Also see:

For our clients, we publishes a critical review on this paper and, in our view, a more realistic re-evaluation of this great economic potential.

Biomass for furfural production: Distiller's Grain

Connecting-the-Dots™

Reference:

[1] dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.02.025, Co-production of feed and furfural from dried distillers’ grains to improve corn ethanol profitability, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706, United States

  • Furfural
  • Distiller's Grain
  • Feed
  • Corn
  • Maize...

Source:  http://www.dalinyebo.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=776:pre-treatment-of-feed-furfural-from-dried-distillers-grains&Itemid=2828

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Paid4PreTreatment™: Smart integration of furfural production

In July 2013, we reported on the potential that distiller's grain has for furfural production. The smart integration of furfural production into the mass and energy balance (The-Right-Balance™: in this case of a corn ethanol plant) results in energy savings, an additional saleable product (furfural) and an improved end product (in this case animal feed). These improvements were highlighted by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA) in a process and economic study[1]:

Furfural was produced from DDG while animal feed value of DDG was also retained.

Furfural was produced through dilute acid reaction followed by batch or BRD process.

BRD was superior to batch method in furfural yield and purity.

The economic model predicted an increased profitability for corn ethanol plants.

Animal feed yield was crucial to the economy of the furfural conversion process.

The basis of their economic evaluation is based on assuming favourable inputs (e.g. highest furfural price, best yields, experimental laboratory and mathematical modelling conditions, etc.).

Our review this publication, against our practical furfural processes experience, predicts a lower benefit than the study suggests.

However, it is important to note that there is certainly a benefit (!) and, in addition, there are other untapped downstream revenue potentials.

Also see:

For our clients, we publishes a critical review on this paper and, in our view, a more realistic re-evaluation of this great economic potential.

Biomass for furfural production: Distiller's Grain

Connecting-the-Dots™

Reference:

[1] dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.02.025, Co-production of feed and furfural from dried distillers’ grains to improve corn ethanol profitability, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706, United States

  • Furfural
  • distiller's grain
  • feed
  • corn
  • maize...

Global 1,4-Butanediol Market Expected to Reach USD 6947.1 Million by 2020

Global 1,4-Butanediol Market Expected to Reach USD 6947.1 Million by 2020. THF emerged as the leading application for 1,4-BDO and accounted for 29.9% of the total market volume in 2013.

DalinYebo‘s insight:

Furfural is the green chemical building blocks, that leads to THF, PolyTHF and its polymers (like Lycra®). See http://j.mp/GQHGob.

See on www.prweb.com

via Scoop.itFurfural and its many By-products...

Source:  https://dalinyebo.wordpress.com/2014/03/12/global-14-butanediol-market-expected-to-reach-usd-6947-1-million-by-2020/

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Furfuryl Mercaptan: The good smell of roasted coffee

Although in concentrated form, furfuryl mercaptan is a foul smelling compound. In 1926 it was already patented as coffee’s main odor active compound. It is a furan molecule substituted with a sulfanylmethyl group and is a clear colourless liquid when pure, but it becomes yellow coloured upon prolonged standing.

flavorscientist.com: Furfuryl mercaptan (otherwise known as coffee mercaptan) is the characterizing component of coffee. Coffee flavor and Furfuryl mercaptan are generated by a roasting process and a chemical reaction called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is one of the most important reactions in food flavor development. The Maillard reaction is between a carbonyl group (sugar) and an amino compound (protein). Degradation of the condensation products of this reaction give a number of oxygenated compounds; such as furans, pyrazines, pyrroles, oxazoles, thiophenes, thiazoles and other heterocyclic compounds.

Furfuryl mercaptan is found in other roasted foods: beef, pork, chicken and popcorn.

coffeechemistry.com: What else is your cup of coffee?

Also see:

Furfural Derivatives in Apple Cider and Wine

The expert panel of FEMA (Flavor and Extract Manufacturers' Association) assessed Furfural as GRAS (generally recognised as safe). More ..

  • Furfural and its many Byproducts
  • coffee
  • Flavour...
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